December 15, 2020

300 Palabras

By Mario Melgar-Adalid

The New U.S.-Mexico Relationship

The arrival of Joe Biden to the White House will bring about changes in the U.S.-Mexico relationship. Although both countries will fundamentally remain the same, what will change is how the new U.S. administration will handle international relations, specifically the relationship with its neighbor south of the Rio Grande. For starters, talks on the border wall that was supposed to be built will be canceled and, generally, a more institutional and predictable relationship can be expected. For example, it is unlikely that Mexico will once again face threats of tariffs to reduce the burden of tens of thousands of immigrants, mostly Central Americans, but many Mexicans too, crossing the border and settling in the U.S. The reality is that those who aspire to reach the United States will keep trying to do so, particularly because the economic conditions in their home countries have deteriorated even further, due to the health, security, and economic crises in Central America. Importantly, the U.S-Mexico bilateral relationship, one of the most complex international relationships in the world, will again be assumed by the U. S. State Department. Issues of security, the fight against drug trafficking, the economy, and the environment will return to the agenda as priorities. In any case, it is expected that the knowledge that U.S. president-elect Joe Biden has about Mexico after decades of building close ties with Mexico, will be an important factor in achieving a supportive, productive, respectful, and fruitful relationship, which is what both great countries deserve.